2d Heli-Portable Seismic Program, Colville Hills, Sahtu Settlement Area

Grant Clarke (NWT Archaeologist’s Permit 2007-003)

Golder Associates Ltd. was contracted by Alpine Environmental Ltd. to conduct a Heritage Resources Impact Assessment on a 2D Heli‐portable Seismic Program located in the Colville Hills, northeast of Fort Good Hope, Northwest Territories on behalf of BG Canada Exploration and Production Inc. This assessment was completed in June of 2007 under Permit No. 2007‐003 issued to Grant Clarke of Golder Associates Ltd. Field investigations were completed by Grant Clarke and Wilfred Jackson of Fort Good Hope. The purpose of the study was to identify, record, and evaluate heritage sites in potential conflict with proposed development activities, so that appropriate avoidance or mitigation measures could be incorporated into the plans for this project.

The Project consisted of approximately 200 kilometres of seismic lines which crossed the Hare Indian River valley within the K’ahsho Got’ine District of the Sahtu Settlement Area. Seismic lines were hand slashed and were all 1.5 metres in width or less. Seismic shot holes were a minimum of 100 metres from all waterbodies and watercourses so no disturbances were to be made of any watercourse banks.

The HRIA completed for the Project included helicopter overflights of the proposed seismic lines and on‐ground assessments of landforms considered to possess potential for heritage resources. Areas investigated were selected based on prefield map and airphoto analysis and were refined during the helicopter overflights. Due to the low impact nature of the Project, on‐ground assessments were restricted to areas of high potential to contain heritage resources, except in those instances where low and moderate potential lands were fortuitously examined in the effort to cross between landing locations and high potential areas. The purpose of the study was to identify, record, and evaluate heritage sites in potential conflict with proposed development activities, so that appropriate avoidance or mitigation measures could be incorporated into the plans for these projects.

No archaeological sites were identified during the prefield records review within the immediate vicinity of the Project. Traditional Knowledge workshops did identify that portions of the Colville Lake Trail (K’abamį Tué Eht’ene) are located in the region. No evidence of K’abamį Tué Eht’ene was observed during the field investigations. No heritage resources were found in conflict with the proposed project through pedestrian transects, shovel testing and low level helicopter overflights.

(Edited by Shelley Crouch, Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre)