Showing items 11 - 15 of 69 for Dene.

2012.008.003
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Moose call

Object 2012.008.003

Moose call

Moose call

A moose call made from a juvenile bull moose scapula (shoulder bone). A hunter uses it by scraping it up along a tree during the rut season to create an attractive sound. The object has been carved to easily fit a hunter’s hand.

Object Details
Accession No.2012.008.003
MakerBeaulieu, Gordon
Culture
Region
LocationFort Resolution, Great Slave Lake
Date2008
2011.007.003
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Gloves

Object 2011.007.003

Gloves

Gloves

A pair of machine sewn adult-sized gloves with high, wide gauntlet-style wrist cuffs. Made from smoke tanned moose hide with a decorative patch of white stroud, floral embroidery, and beaver trim. The gloves were made by Jane Horassi for her husband Gabe Horassi. Her generation believes that their men should be dressed well.

Object Details
Accession No.2011.007.003
MakerHorassi, Jane
Culture
Region
LocationTulita, Mackenzie River
Datec. 2001
983.039.001
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Canoe

Object 983.039.001

Canoe

Canoe

This spruce bark canoe is made from a single sheet of bark. Bark canoes are made in the spring when the sap is rising and the bark can be easily peeled from the tree. Spruce roots are used to sew the bark at each end of the canoe. Babiche lashings along the gunwales hold the bark in place. Holes in the bark are plugged with spruce gum to keep the water out. Spruce bark canoes were often made for immediate use and then discarded, although a well made canoe could last up to five years.

Object Details
Accession No.983.039.001
MakerKlondike, Johnny
Culture
Region
LocationFort Liard / Liard River
Date1983
981.024.001
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Mooseskin Boat

Object 981.024.001

Mooseskin Boat

Mooseskin Boat

A large boat made of eight moose skins stretched over a spruce wood frame and sewn with sinew and babiche. It was built by Shuta Got’ine elders and youth at the headwaters of the Keele River in 1981 to bring back a fading tradition. The project was the subject of a National Film Board film, ‘The Last Mooseskin Boat’. After the boat was built, it travelled down the Mackenzie River to Tulita and has been on exhibit at the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre ever since. Shuta Got’ine inhabiting the mountains west of the Mackenzie River traveled in moose skin boats from the late 19th century to the 1950s. They were made at mountain camps in early summer to transport people, dogs, dried meat, hides and other goods down the fast-flowing rivers to Mackenzie River trading posts. Built as temporary craft, the boats were dismantled after the journey, and materials reused.

Object Details
Accession No.981.024.001
MakerEtchinelle, Gabe; Pellissey, George; Pellissey, Vivian; MacCauley, Jonas; Neyelle, Leon; Karkagie, Madelaine; Tetso, Cecilia
Culture
Region
LocationDélı̨nę, Great Bear Lake / Tulita, Mackenzie River
Date1981