Showing items 36 - 38 of 38 for : Press Release.

Museum Alive! Open House
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James Jerome Exhibit on display at the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre

Yellowknife (June 4, 2009) – An exhibit of photographs by Gwich’in photographer James Jerome will be on display at the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre (PWNHC) this summer and fall, and travelling throughout the Gwich’in Settlement Area over the winter.Jerome was a professional photographer born in Aklavik and schooled in Inuvik. He worked in the Northwest Territories in the 1970s. This exhibit is the culmination of a cataloguing and digitization project, involving over 3500 James Jerome photographs. The selected photos were taken at fish camps between 1977-1979 in the Gwich’in traditional land use areas along the Mackenzie, Peel and Arctic Red Rivers.

In 1979, a house fire claimed Jerome’s life and damaged many of the negatives and prints that are now in the NWT Archives, donated by Jerome’s partner, Elizabeth Jansen Hadlari, and son Thomas Hadlari. In 2008, the Gwich’in Social and Culture Institute (GSCI) coordinated workshops in the Gwich’in communities of Tsiigehtchic and Fort McPherson, where elders helped to identify people and places in the photographs. 3,500 of the photographs were given detailed descriptions.

“These photographs are a learning tool and help us celebrate the past of the Gwich’in people,” said the Honourable Jackson Lafferty, Minister of Education, Culture and Employment. “Congratulations to everyone who worked on the project.”

The public is invited to the exhibit’s official opening on June 7th from 2:00 – 4:00 pm. Tea and bannock will be served. The exhibit will be on display at the PWNHC from June 7th to November 1st, 2009. It will be travelling in the Gwich’in Settlement Area communities of Inuvik, Aklavik, Fort McPherson and Tsiigehtchic between November 2009 and June 2010.

For more information, contact:

Shawn McCann
Manager of Public Affairs
Education, Culture and Employment
Tel: (867) 920-6222

Museum Alive! Open House
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Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre Opening Exhibit of Pihuaqtiuyugut: We Are the Long Distance Walkers

YELLOWKNIFE (September 19, 2008) – Please join the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre (PWNHC) on September 21st from 2:00 to 4:00 pm for the opening of its latest exhibit, Pihuaqtiuyugut: We are the long distance walkers. The exhibit will be on display at the PWNHC from September 21 to the end of February 2009.This exhibit comes from the Ulukhaktok Literacies Project, a collaboration of the NWT Literacy Council, the University of Lethbridge, the Inuvialuit Cultural Resource Centre, and the people of Ulukhaktok. These groups joined together to learn about the land routes and literacies of the Kangiryuarmiut (the Inuit of Prince Albert Sound, Victoria Island). The land route studied was used by the Kangiryuarmiut to travel from the sea ice inland to caribou calving grounds. Along the way, the people used multiple literacies: they marked the land with stone formations; they read the weather; they told stories; performed dances and songs; and created clothing and art.

“I’ve always been really excited about this project because I’ve learned so much from it,” said Emily Kudlak, community researcher for the Inuvialuit Cultural Resource Centre. “We’ve been able to document the knowledge that our Elders hold about our language, and the literacies that go along with our language and culture. It helps us to understand our own literacies. This is important information that we can now pass on to the next generation.”

“This exhibit is a great opportunity for people to retrace the footsteps of our elders and experience life as they did,” said Jackson Lafferty, Minister of Education, Culture and Employment. “I encourage residents to come and see this important cultural display.”

Visitors can follow the route and learn traditional names of places along the way, or read elders’ recollections of traditional activities. Artwork from Ulukhaktok depicting the region, and traditional tools and cultural materials will be on display. Traditional drum dance clothing is on loan from the Canadian Museum of Civilization.

Come out to the PWNHC on September 21st between 2:00 and 4:00 pm for the opening event for Pihuaqtiuyugut: We are the long distance walkers. The event will feature live drum songs, and interactive activities like string games, printmaking, and sewing felt cut-outs with artists from the region. Refreshments will be available.

For more information, please contact:

Shawn McCann
Manager of Public Affairs
Education, Culture and Employment
(867) 920-6222

Museum Alive! Open House
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Tsiigehtchic Steppe Bison Discovery Update

Yellowknife (June 27, 2008) – In September of 2007, Tsiigehtchic resident Shane Van Loon discovered animal remains unlike any he had seen before eroding from the side of a hill beside the Arctic Red River.The remains were of a steppe bison, which became extinct at the end of the last Ice Age about 10,000 years ago. Steppe bison were much larger relatives of modern bison, the Tsiigehtchic steppe bison has a horn-span of about 1 meter across. In addition to being the first undisturbed discovery of a steppe bison in the Northwest Territories (NWT), the remains are exciting because they were well-preserved by the permafrost of the area, and include soft tissues that are not often intact in remains of that age.

“The Tsiigehtchic steppe bison is one of the most interesting fossil discoveries made in the Northwest Territories. It will allow us to better understand what it was like here when glaciers first disappeared from the land.” said Tom Andrews, NWT Territorial Archaeologist with the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre (PWNHC).

Earlier this spring, Mr. Van Loon provided the remains to the PWNHC. The Tsiigehtchic steppe bison is now preserved in Department of Environment and Natural Resources cold storage under the professional care and observation of the PWNHC.

The PWNHC, a division of the Department of Education, Culture and Employment, is developing a plan for study and preservation of the remains and for educating Northerners about the discovery, in consultation with the community of Tsiigehtchic and the Gwich’in Social and Cultural Institute.

Yukon Palaeontologist Dr. Grant Zazula and biologist Dr. Beth Shapiro of Pennsylvania State University, an expert on steppe bison, have both provided advice and expertise on the Tsiigehtchic steppe bison and continue to work with PWNHC to develop the research and study plan surrounding the discovery.

Images of the bison head are available to the media on request.

For more information, contact:

Shawn McCann
Manager, Public Affairs
Education, Culture and Employment
Tel: (867) 920-6222