Showing items 11 - 15 of 38 for : Press Release.

Canada’s Waterscapes
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Dive into Canada’s Waterscapes at the Museum

poster-event-2014-waterscape-events

YELLOWKNIFE (February 14, 2014) – The Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre presents Canada’s Waterscapes – Yours To Enjoy, Explore and Protect from February 13 until August 31, 2014. The exhibit features Canada’s diverse, complex and beautiful aquatic ecosystem and highlights several northern watersheds.

“We are thrilled to be bringing Canada’s Waterscapes to the Northwest Territories,” says Minister of Education, Culture and Employment Jackson Lafferty. “It is through shared resources that we have this opportunity to engage Northerners in an issue that is vital to all of us – water and its stewardship. From oceans to wetlands to river systems, the Canadian Museum of Nature’s exhibition inspires visitors to consider the ecological and deep cultural significance of our own northern waterways.”

The exhibition is produced by the Canadian Museum of Nature in partnership with Parks Canada, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, RBC and the Canadian Water Network, with support from Canadian Geographic.

Visitors can dive into a study of estuaries, lakes, rivers, oceans and wetlands and uncover the beautiful life that depends upon these habitats. In each section, a specific area of Canada is highlighted. The exhibition also shares numerous stewardship stories about efforts being made by agencies like Parks Canada as well as by individuals to help protect our delicate aquatic ecosystems.

For the month of March, the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre is partnering with the Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Ecology North and the Walter and Duncan Gordon Foundation to present a series of water-focused events including film screenings, lectures and a panel presentation.

For more information:
Ashley Green
Public Affairs and Communications Officer
Education, Culture and Employment
Phone: (867) 920-3059
Email: ashley_green@gov.nt.ca

Long lost historical film to screen
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Long lost historical film to screen

On Wednesday, February 19th, Yellowknife will get a glimpse of life in the North in 1957 as Dr. Tom Andrews, Territorial Archaeologist at the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre, screens Tie-cho-ka: Quelques images du Grand Nord.

The film has already been screened this month in Tulita and Norman Wells.

“This is an exciting opportunity for residents to witness the traditional ways of life in the Sahtu and mining heritage in Yellowknife,” says the Honourable Jackson Lafferty, Minister of Education, Culture and Employment. “This film is a wonderful lead in to Heritage Week in February and Aboriginal Languages Month in March, as we celebrate the importance of promoting and preserving our cultures, languages and traditions.”

The film was shot in 1957 by French anthropologist Jean Michéa and documents his travel to Yellowknife, Norman Wells and eventually to the Keele River in the mountains with the Shúhtagot’ine. The mountain footage is remarkable, covering more than half of the 25 minute silent film, and shows several Shúhtagot’ine families in their traditional lifestyles.

Approached by elders in the Sahtu to find the footage, Dr. Andrews spent two decades searching for Mr. Michéa. In December 2013, Dr. Andrews managed to connect with the filmmaker with the help of Dr. Chris Fletcher at Université Laval and his network of contacts in France. Now 95 years old and living in Paris, Mr. Michéa was able to dig through his personal archives and send a copy of the film. Dr. Andrews’ remarkable dedication to finding the footage is a tribute to his continued work in Northern archaeology.

The Yellowknife screenings is scheduled for Wednesday, February 19 at 7:00pm at PWNHC.

News Coverage

The recovery of Michéa’s film has been covered in the national press:

  • Decades-long hunt for mysterious French filmmaker yields rare look into the forgotten past of a Canadian tribe, National Post February 13, 2014.
  • 18-year quest brings 1957 film home to N.W.T. Dene, CBC News, February 1, 2014
Museum Alive! Open House
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Museum Alive! Open House

YELLOWKNIFE (November 26, 2013) – The Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre (PWNHC) is pleased to announce the Museum Alive! Open House – a fantastic opportunity to see the museum come to life and experience contemporary NWT culture in an interactive way.

Visitors of all ages are invited to attend the event on Sunday, December 1, between 12 – 4pm to enjoy storytelling in the Aviation and Discovery Galleries, live music provided by the Fiddlecats, hand games, crafts, a photo booth, refreshments, and much more.

Exhibits will be brought to life by PWNHC staff and special guest interpreters, providing fascinating information and facts about the exhibits and artifacts that can be found at the museum. There will also be an opportunity for visitors to bring their old photos of family and friends to be digitized by NWT Archives.

“We are excited to invite the community for a peek behind the scenes at the museum,” says Barb Cameron, Director of the PWNHC. “Museum Alive! focuses on the art and skills of keeping culture and heritage alive with exhibits featuring stories and demonstrations from museum staff and local experts. If you have not yet had the chance to visit the museum, or want to experience it in a different way, this will be a great opportunity.”

This open house is part of the museum’s Amazing Family Sundays series of events happening throughout the fall in Yellowknife.

For more information, please contact:

Cale Frombach
Communications and Public Affairs Officer
Education, Culture and Employment
Phone: (867) 920-8603
Email: cale_frombach@gov.nt.ca

Museum Alive! Open House
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GNWT officially recognizes Gwich’in names

YELLOWKNIFE (June 20, 2013) – On June 21, 2013 the Government of the Northwest Territories will officially recognize 414 traditional Gwich’in geographical, or place, names reflecting their land use across the Gwich’in Settlement Area of the NWT.

During the 19th and 20th centuries, many traditional place names fell into disuse or were replaced by colonial names for rivers, lakes, mountains and settlements. Through the efforts of the Gwich’in Social and Cultural Institute working closely with Gwich’in Elders between 1992 and 2012, these names have been restored to reflect the Gwich’in heritage and culture.

“We are very pleased to see these names recognized in our official records,” said Minister of Education, Culture and Employment Jackson Lafferty. “Our efforts in language revitalization and preservation, providing opportunities for cultural projects and artisans across the North, and educating our youth on the importance of their heritage are all part of our identity as Northerners. The Gwich’in language is one of the most endangered Aboriginal languages in all of Canada, so every initiative promoting its use is of paramount importance.”

The NWT Cultural Places Program at the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre is responsible for geographical names of features and places in the NWT. The Program coordinates official recognition for place name changes, placing special emphasis on the recognition of Aboriginal language place names as directed by the NWT Geographical and Community Names Policy.

The Gwich’in Social and Cultural Institute has also installed an exhibit at the Museum featuring the new place names and their cultural and historical significance, open to the public on June 22, 2013.

Ashley Green
Public Affairs Officer
Education, Culture and Employment
Phone: (867) 920-3059
Email: ashley_green@gov.nt.ca

Museum Alive! Open House
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NWT Residents Honoured at Minister’s Cultural Circle Ceremony

YELLOWKNIFE (October 17, 2012) – Five Northwest Territories residents and organizations were honoured this morning at the second annual Minister’s Cultural Circle Award Ceremony. The event took place in the Great Hall of the Legislative Assembly and was as a way to recognise the important and lasting contributions of those dedicated to the arts and cultures of the North.

“Arts, culture and heritage play an important role in the Northwest Territories,” said the Honourable Jackson Lafferty, Minister of Education, Culture and Employment. “They weave a culturally diverse mosaic of who we are as individuals and as a territory. This year’s recipients pride themselves on making a positive and lasting impact on the lives of countless NWT residents, and I applaud them for their outstanding achievement and passion.”

The Minister’s Cultural Circle provides lasting recognition of those who contribute to the preservation and promotion of culture and heritage in the NWT. It helps build awareness among all northerners about the importance of promoting, protecting, preserving and celebrating our unique culture, heritage and ways of life. An independent panel of judges chose one recipient from each of the four categories, with a fifth recipient receiving the Minister’s Choice Award.

The 2012 Minister’s Cultural Circle recipients are:

  • Doris Taneton from Deline – Youth Category;
  • Lillian Elias from Inuvik – Elder Category;
  • Melaw Nakehk’o from Fort Simpson – Individual Category;
  • Tłı̨chǫ Imbe Program – Group Category; and
  • Jean Harry from Sachs Harbour – Minister’s Choice Award.

More information about each recipient is available below.

2012 Minister’s Cultural Circle Award Recipients:

Spending time with Elders and working with language, traditional knowledge and cultural projects, 23-year-old Doris Taneton is a strong young aboriginal leader. She is fluent in both English and North Slavey, participates in northern governance conferences and dedicates time to working with local projects such as the Deline Knowledge Project.

Reflecting on what it means to practice traditional culture in a contemporary world, Melaw Nakehk’o demonstrates a strong level of commitment and enthusiasm to share her journey of learning the knowledge of her elders. Earlier this year, she set out to learn the art of tanning moosehides and has since been supporting other women wanting to learn the art form, thereby beginning a cultural revitalization movement among the younger generations of the Northwest Territories.

Since retiring from her position as an Inuvialuktun teacher, Lillian Elias has only increased her pride and passion in preserving her language and culture. She continues teaching the language to adults in her community in the evening; she hosts an annual language camp for youth and young children at her bush camp; and she assists the cultural centre, aboriginal languages programs and elementary language teachers with the making of language materials. Her passion is to see all young adults in her community speak Inuvialuktun.

Recognizing that youth were struggling to be “strong like two people” after leaving their communities to attend post-secondary school or employment opportunities, the Tłı̨chǫ Government introduced the Tłı̨chǫ Imbe Program in 2011. This summer employment program hires Tłı̨chǫ youth to spend eleven weeks in their own communities, working with and learning from community Elders, and learning modern safety skills and technology. Youth earn first aid, canoe safety and GPS mapping certification as well as learning traditional skills, such as fishing, drum and paddle making, sewing, hide preparation, traditional medicines and travel routes. The Tłı̨chǫ Imbe Program is the beginning of a successful cultural revitalization in all the Tlicho communities.

As both an artist and an Inuvialuktun language teacher, Jean Harry’s work has profoundly impacted the younger generations of Sachs Harbour residents to continue learning their language. Through her love of her language and culture, she has influenced the development of many leaders, teachers and young Inuvialuit across the North. For all her work in and support of the Inuvialuktun language and culture, Jean Harry receives the Minister’s Choice Award.

For more information contact:

Ashley Green
Public Affairs Officer
Education, Culture and Employment
Phone: (867) 920-3059
Email: ashley_green@gov.nt.ca