Showing items 6 - 10 of 38 for : Press Release.

This Land is Our Home:  Wıìlıìdeh Yellowknives Dene Exhibit Opening
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Media Advisory: Wıìlıìdeh Yellowknives Dene Exhibit Opening

YELLOWKNIFE (September 22, 2015) – The Yellowknives Dene First Nation (YKDFN) and the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre (PWNHC) invite you to the official opening of This Land Is Our Home, Wıìlıìdeh Yellowknives Dene.

The exhibit features artifacts, traditional clothing, tools, photographs, and historical information on the Dene who have lived in and around Wıìlıìcheh (Yellowknife Bay) and Wıìlıìdeh (Yellowknife River) for thousands of years.

Two years in the making, the exhibit is a community partnership between YKDFN and PWNHC staff. Community curator Fred Sangris, former N’dilo chief and dog musher, worked closely with elders and PWNHC staff to present Yellowknives Dene culture and history from their own point of view. Mary Rose Sundberg, of Detah’s Goyatiko Language Centre, has also been involved as an interpreter and language consultant.

YKDFN elders have guided the content of the exhibit by providing historical information; identifying traditional place names and village sites; providing and identifying people and places in archival photographs; and loaning family tools and clothing for display.

Visitors will learn about the traditional territory of the Yellowknives Dene, who lived in seasonal villages around Yellowknife Bay and travelled to the tundra to hunt caribou, as well as the meaning behind words such as ‘Weledeh’ and ‘Yellowknife’.

The official opening will commence with a fire feeding ceremony at 12pm on Saturday, October 3rd. Yellowknives Dene members will offer live interpretation and demonstrations about their culture and history throughout the afternoon.

The exhibit will be on display at Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre for the next three years.

Media inquiries:
Tami Johnson
Communications Specialist
Department of Education, Culture and Employment
P. 920-6147
E. tami_johnson@gov.nt.ca

Ice Age Bison Exhibit
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Media Advisory: Ice Age Bison

Ice Age Bison Discovery: Our Frozen Past and Thawing Future

New exhibit about NWT ice age bison opens with presentation by award-winning illustrator Julius T. Csotonyi

Media Advisory

On Thursday, June 18th, at 7pm, the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage officially opens Ice Age Bison Discovery: Our Frozen Past and Thawing Future.  On exhibit for the first time — a 13,650-year-old steppe bison skull found in Tsiigehtchic, NWT in 2007. This exhibit highlights ice age fossils and the changing landscape of the North.

The exhibit includes a strikingly realistic mural of the NWT ice age bison, created by Vancouver-based paleoartist Julius T. Csotonyi.  Highly regarded as a natural history illustrator, Csotonyi draws on his scientific expertise (PHD in natural sciences) to “restore as realistically as possible the curiously alien environments that earth has hosted in its deep past”.

Csotonyi’s work was recently featured in a special series of stamps by Canada Post, Dinos of Canada. The Royal Canadian Mint also recently commissioned Cstonyi to create phosphorescent and silver engraved prehistoric themed coins.  Other projects several life-sized dinosaur murals (up to 150 feet long) for the Royal Ontario Museum’s 2012 exhibit, ‘Ultimate Dinosaurs; Giants from Gondwana’, life-sized murals of dinosaurs for the Dinosaur Hall (2011) at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County and most of the artwork for the new Hall of Paleontology at the Houston Museum of Natural Science.

Join us Thursday, June 18th, 7pm, at the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre auditorium  to discover how Csotonyi draws on his scientific background to reconstruct ancient worlds through illustration. Ice age mammals, dinosaurs and ancient landscapes will be featured in this informative presentation.

Leading up to the exhibit opening, young, budding artists are invited to participate in a colouring contest that will be judged by Csotonyi. Prizes will be awarded to the winners. Drop by PWNHC to enter the contest or click here.

To see Csotonyi’s work, visit csotonyi.com.

Media inquiries:

Tami Johnson
Communications Specialist
Department of Education, Culture and Employment
P. 920-6147
E. tami_johnson@gov.nt.ca

Press Release: Inuvialuit Sculptor Abraham Anghik Ruben
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Press Release: Inuvialuit Sculptor Abraham Anghik Ruben

Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre Presents Inuvialuit Sculptor Abraham Anghik Ruben

Yellowknife (April 21, 2015) – The Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre (PWNHC) is pleased to present the opening of a new exhibition of sculptures by Paulatuk-born artist, Abraham Anghik Ruben. The exhibition, Aurora Borealis, opens April 30, 2015 and will run through April 30, 2016. Thirty soapstone and bronze sculptures will occupy the museums’ feature gallery, including works from private collections as well as from the PWNHC’s permanent collection.

This exhibition follows a tour at The Rockwell in Corning, New York in 2014 and the Smithsonian’s prestigious National Museum of the American Indian in 2012.

The art of Inuvialuit artist Abraham Anghik Ruben (b. 1951) portrays journeys of exploration, migration, and displacement through voyages across time and place, and into the spiritual realm. In these recent sculptures, Ruben contrasts the ancient lives of two northern peoples-Norse adventurers and Inuvialuit whale hunters-guiding us to a new perspective on the complex history of the Arctic; a history shaped by movement, contact, and change. Working in stone, whalebone and ivory, Ruben creates sculptures that speak to “ancient voices from a time when these two northern peoples held a reverence for the land and for all living things therein.”

Born in a camp near Paulatuk, Ruben spent his early childhood traveling with his family across vast expanses of land and sea, hunting caribou, polar bear, musk-oxen and beluga whales, and “living to the ancient rhythms of life passed down through the generations.”

The public is invited to the official opening of Aurora Borealis on Thursday, April 30th, 7pm at the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre. Inuvialuit drummers and dancers will open the evening with a performance after which Abraham Anghik Ruben will give a brief artist talk. Refreshments will be served by the Museum Café.

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Media inquiries:
Tami Johnson
Communications Specialist
Department of Education, Culture and Employment
P. 920-6147
E. tami_johnson@gov.nt.ca

Press Release: Thomas Berger to open exhibit
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Press Release: Thomas Berger to open exhibit

Former Justice Thomas Berger to open exhibit at Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre

YELLOWKNIFE (Feb 27, 2015): Former Justice Thomas Berger will be visiting the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre to officially open the Thunder in our Voices exhibit currently on display until April 30, 2015.

Between 1975 and 1977, Justice Thomas Berger visited thirty communities in the NWT and the Yukon to hold hearings into the proposed Mackenzie Valley Pipeline. The Berger Inquiry broke with tradition by considering perspectives offered by community members in their own languages. This year marks the fortieth anniversary of this process, whereby the people of the MacKenzie Valley impacted the project by telling their stories in their own words.

“The exhibit at the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre is full of familiar faces that participated in this process,” said Minister Jackson Lafferty of the Department of Education, Culture and Employment. “The Museum is an important caretaker of our culture and heritage, and the collaboratively-created travelling multimedia exhibit contributes to our history through community photographs, video, and personal stories.”

In 1975, freelance journalist Drew Ann Wake traveled to the Northwest Territories to cover the Inquiry. Five years ago, Wake dug out her original sound recordings and photographs from that time. Along with photographer Linda MacCannell, Wake visited local schools in twenty-five villages across the Mackenzie River over several summers. Families looked at the archives together, and youth interviewed their parents and grandparents about their experiences with the Inquiry. The exhibit combines the remembrances of original participants as well as a new generation of youth reflecting on the legacy of the Berger Inquiry, all of whom helped create the exhibit.

Mr. Berger will be working with students throughout the day on Tuesday, March 3, and will be in attendance to do a public presentation and officially open the exhibit in the evening.

The Northern Heritage Centre maintains an online resource of Berger materials including recordings, photographs and video from the Inquiry.

Contact:
Jacqueline McKinnon
Department of Education, Culture and Employment
P: 920-6222
E: jacqueline_mckinnon@gov.nt.ca

Walking With Our Sisters Exhibit Opening
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Media Advisory: Walking With Our Sisters

Special Media Event Invitation
Walking With Our Sisters Exhibit Opens January 9, 2015
YELLOWKNIFE, Northwest Territories

January 5, 2015 (Yellowknife) – Walking With Our Sisters, an international touring art exhibit that honors missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls will be at the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre in Yellowknife January 9-24, 2015.

Media will have a special opportunity to learn more about this initiative and develop stories in relation to this much-anticipated exhibit prior to the official opening.

Media Special Session: Friday, January 9, 2015 – 9:30 am – 11 am
Media who would like to capture footage, or take photographs of the installation are invited to this special media session. Photographs and video footage are not permitted in the exhibit at any time during or after the opening ceremony at noon.

Opening Ceremony: Friday, January 9, 2015 at 12 noon
Everyone is encouraged to attend the opening ceremony. This event is free. It features a feeding the fire ceremony and the lighting of a qulliq, followed by a buffet lunch. The exhibit will be open for public viewing immediately after the opening ceremony.

Exhibit Hours:
Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday 10:30 am – 5 pm
Thursdays – 10:30 am until 8 pm
Mondays – closed

In Canada, it is estimated that more than 1,181 Indigenous women and girls have gone missing or been murdered in the last 30 years. In response to this issue, 1,808 pairs of moccasin tops have been created by more than 1,372 caring and concerned people in honor and memory of Indigenous women and girls who have gone missing or been murdered. This large collaborative art piece opened in Edmonton in 2013 where 2,200 people visited its premier.

To arrange interviews in advance or for more information contact:

Aggie Brockman (867) 873-4588 / abrockman@northwestel.net
Nola Nallugiak (867) 447-1010 / nnallugiak@hotmail.com
Lila Erasmus (867) 447-1991 / lila.erasmus@outlook.com