Updated on October 22, 2018.

Upcoming Events

NameDescriptionCategoriesVenueDate
Hours of OperationAuditorium4 January
pîkiskwe – speak: An Invitation to Conversations in Reconciliation

Art & Film Installation An Invitation to Conversations in Reconciliation

Featuring:

Lost My Talk

Mixed-Media Sculpture & Other Artworks by Lana Whiskeyjack

Lana Gets Her Talk

Documentary Film by Beth Wishart Mackenzie Admission is Free Additional Screenings & Art Exhibit at PWNHC: Oct 27, 2:00 PM/Nov 1, 7:00 PM/Nov 10, 2:00 PM [pdf-embedder url="https://www.pwnhc.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/pikiskwe.pdf" title="Pikiskwe"]
Auditorium27 October, 2:00 pm
Music at the Museum • Heure musicale au muséeJoin us for the first concert of the season in a series of free concerts presented by Classics On Stage Yellowknife. Featuring performances by COSY Members & students of COSY members. COSY's AGM will follow at 4pm. COSY welcomes all musicians to attend the AGM. Everyone is welcome!Cafe29 October, 3:00 pm
pîkiskwe – speak: An Invitation to Conversations in Reconciliation

Art & Film Installation An Invitation to Conversations in Reconciliation

Featuring:

Lost My Talk

Mixed-Media Sculpture & Other Artworks by Lana Whiskeyjack

Lana Gets Her Talk

Documentary Film by Beth Wishart Mackenzie Admission is Free Additional Screenings & Art Exhibit at PWNHC: Oct 27, 2:00 PM/Nov 1, 7:00 PM/Nov 10, 2:00 PM [pdf-embedder url="https://www.pwnhc.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/pikiskwe.pdf" title="Pikiskwe"]
Auditorium1 November, 7:00 pm
Art, Power, & Social ChangeJoin YKARCC at the museum for 2 evenings with visiting artists Jaime Black and KC Adams. On Wednesday November 7, Adams and Black will each give an artist’s talk, sharing with audience members several highlights from their extensive bodies of work, their creative process and passion for social justice, and the myriad of critical responses their work has garnered. On Thursday November 8, Black and Adams will join local artists Casey Koyczan, Tania Larsson, and Melaw Nakehk'o in a panel discussion moderated by Dene Nahjo's Mandee McDonald. Panelists will discuss the artist’s role in social change, speaking about indigenous creativity as a powerful catalyst in decolonization processes. ** Jaime Black is a Metis multidisciplinary artist based in Winnipeg. In her artwork, she attempts to create a dialogue around social and political events and issues, through provocation or creating space for reflection. She is particularly interested in feminism and Aboriginal social justice, and the possibilities for articulating linkages between and around these movements. Her most notorious work is The REDress Project, which focuses around the issue of missing or murdered Aboriginal women across Canada. It is an installation art project based on an aesthetic response to this critical national issue. The dresses are installed in public spaces across Canada as a visual reminder of the staggering number of women who are no longer with us. Through the installation, Black hopes to draw attention to the gendered and racialized nature of violent crimes against Aboriginal women and to evoke a presence through the marking of absence. KC Adams is a nationally acclaimed, award winning Winnipeg-based artist who graduated from Concordia University. Her visual work is part of many national and international permanent collections. Adams has an ongoing public art campaign called Perception that was on display all over Winnipeg, MB and Lethbridge, AB. Perception is a series of controversial photographic diptychs portraying individuals of First Nations or Metis ancestry. Consisting of seventeen large format photographs, and displayed on commercial billboards, public transit, in bus shelters and on outdoor digital display, Perception boldly challenges stereotypes of first nations citizens, and stares down racism in the face.Auditorium7 November, 6:30 pm
Art, Power, & Social ChangeJoin YKARCC at the museum for 2 evenings with visiting artists Jaime Black and KC Adams. On Wednesday November 7, Adams and Black will each give an artist’s talk, sharing with audience members several highlights from their extensive bodies of work, their creative process and passion for social justice, and the myriad of critical responses their work has garnered. On Thursday November 8, Black and Adams will join local artists Casey Koyczan, Tania Larsson, and Melaw Nakehk'o in a panel discussion moderated by Dene Nahjo's Mandee McDonald. Panelists will discuss the artist’s role in social change, speaking about indigenous creativity as a powerful catalyst in decolonization processes. ** Jaime Black is a Metis multidisciplinary artist based in Winnipeg. In her artwork, she attempts to create a dialogue around social and political events and issues, through provocation or creating space for reflection. She is particularly interested in feminism and Aboriginal social justice, and the possibilities for articulating linkages between and around these movements. Her most notorious work is The REDress Project, which focuses around the issue of missing or murdered Aboriginal women across Canada. It is an installation art project based on an aesthetic response to this critical national issue. The dresses are installed in public spaces across Canada as a visual reminder of the staggering number of women who are no longer with us. Through the installation, Black hopes to draw attention to the gendered and racialized nature of violent crimes against Aboriginal women and to evoke a presence through the marking of absence. KC Adams is a nationally acclaimed, award winning Winnipeg-based artist who graduated from Concordia University. Her visual work is part of many national and international permanent collections. Adams has an ongoing public art campaign called Perception that was on display all over Winnipeg, MB and Lethbridge, AB. Perception is a series of controversial photographic diptychs portraying individuals of First Nations or Metis ancestry. Consisting of seventeen large format photographs, and displayed on commercial billboards, public transit, in bus shelters and on outdoor digital display, Perception boldly challenges stereotypes of first nations citizens, and stares down racism in the face.Auditorium8 November, 6:30 pm
pîkiskwe – speak: An Invitation to Conversations in Reconciliation

Art & Film Installation An Invitation to Conversations in Reconciliation

Featuring:

Lost My Talk

Mixed-Media Sculpture & Other Artworks by Lana Whiskeyjack

Lana Gets Her Talk

Documentary Film by Beth Wishart Mackenzie Admission is Free Additional Screenings & Art Exhibit at PWNHC: Oct 27, 2:00 PM/Nov 1, 7:00 PM/Nov 10, 2:00 PM [pdf-embedder url="https://www.pwnhc.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/pikiskwe.pdf" title="Pikiskwe"]
Auditorium10 November, 2:00 pm
SchubertiadeCOSY invites you to a :

Schubertiade

featuring guest pianist Cheryl Emery Karapita. Refreshments will be available for purchase from chef Etienne before the concert, starting at 6pm and at Intermission. Schubert
Cafe16 November, 7:00 pm
SchubertiadeCOSY invites you to a :

Schubertiade

featuring guest pianist Cheryl Emery Karapita. Refreshments will be available for purchase from chef Etienne before the concert, starting at 6pm and at Intermission. Schubert
Cafe17 November, 7:00 pm

Upcoming Exhibits

Current Exhibits

NameDescriptionCategoriesGalleryDates
Special Constables in the NWT Virtual Companion ExhibitA virtual companion exhibit celebrating Indigenous northerners and their contribution to the RCMP in the Northwest Territories. This exhibit is presented for the first time in all 11 official languages., Virtual ExhibitSeptember 2018 -
Ingrained LandmarksWoodblock prints and drawings by Chris Robson of Hay River., , MezzanineJune 2018 - December 2018
We took care of Them: RCMP Special Constables in the NWT“We took care of Them” celebrates and honors the contributions of Indigenous people in the NWT to policing in the north. Come to hear stories about Special Constables, told by community members for this exhibit. Learn more about the role that NWT communities played in helping the RCMP through rare video, photographs and interesting objects. This exhibit was created in partnership with the Department of Justice and RCMP “G” Division to celebrate Canada 150., , Aviation GalleryAugust 2017 -
Narrative ThreadsThis exhibition grew out of an online project by the Textile Museum of Canada. The Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre was invited to choose textile-related objects from our collection and submit their stories to Narrative Threads – Crafting the Canadian Quilt., , Feature GalleryFebruary 2017 - October 2018
Making a MuseumSee wonderful new acquisitions from the past decade on display for the first time., , RampAugust 2016 -
This Land is Our Home: Wıìlıìdeh Yellowknives DeneThis is the story of the Wıìlıìdeh Yellowknives Dene First Nation and their traditional territory. The exhibition is a collaboration with YKDFN elders and cultural advisors to showcase their history, language and culture through artifacts, clothing, oral history and photographs., South GalleryOctober 2015 - October 2020
Ice Age Bison Discovery: Our frozen past and thawing futureOn exhibit for the first time — a 13,650-year-old steppe bison skull found in Tsiigehtchic, NWT in 2007. This exhibit highlights ice age fossils and the changing landscape of the North., North GalleryJune 2015 - June 2018
DioramasImmerse yourself in our 10 landscape dioramas that showcase the strong connection northerners have with animals and the land. To create these dioramas, we worked closely with wildlife experts, elders, and community advisors from across the NWT., , North and South GalleriesPermanent -
Mooseskin BoatFrom the late 1800s to the 1950s, mooseskin boats were built by the Shutagot’ine (Mountain Dene) to carry large amounts of cargo along dangerous mountain rivers. This boat was made in 1981 in partnership with the National Film Board and the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre. Come and learn about the largest artifact on permanent display., , Feature GalleryPermanent -